Eagle Vision uses a multi-disciplined approach to create a variety of arts- and communications-based projects and programs that serve communities, uplift humanity, and engender culture. Eagle Vision's goal is to utilize the universality of the arts and communications as a positive tool in serving society according to its evolving needs. It will accomplish this through initiatives designed to:

[1] Connect and empower humanity, especially those enduring conditions of isolation, poverty and war

[2] Touch, move and inspire youth and adults

[3] Uplift citizens of all ages

[4] Effect healing by using the power of the arts in a variety of therapeutic modalities and settings



[1] Connect and empower humanity, especially those enduring conditions of isolation, poverty and war

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Supporting the Development of THE WELL WISHES PROJECT.

A spoken-word/music audio initiative, the intent of THE WELL WISHES PROJECT, first and foremost, is to be a platform for children and youth to be honored for their innate wisdom and creativity.

The first Well Wishes CD, Well Wishes and Blessings (Kids in Iraq), was Grammy Listed for Spoken Word Album for Children and is now successfully connecting youth in the U.S., the Middle East, Kenya, the Congo, Tanzania, Nicaragua, Rwanda, Japan, India, and Denmark in the name of goodwill and a shared desire for a loving, harmonious world.

It’s important to note here that THE WELL WISHES PROJECT is not, and never has been, intended to be an anti-war effort. Rather, the project operates beyond definitions of current problems or conditions. In this day and age, the belief in one’s innate goodness can seem like a naïve premise. But in truth, it is this very goodness that makes children and youth remarkable teachers at this time. Without agenda, honest/pure communication can touch and transform even the hardest of hearts. (Please see Addendum 1b. Well Wishes and Blessings – Project Summary). Eagle Vision Initiatives will continue to distribute the Well Wishes and Blessings CD when requested by communities around the world, and now proposes to launch a second CD, Well Wishes Part 2.

In the response to growing requests for WELL WISHES CD’s from countries around the world, Producer Ruth Mendelson has recognized the need to create an expanded follow-up CD that will include topics not covered in the original.

For example, there are increasing requests for CD’s from children’s refugee camps throughout the Congo, where rape is a common reality for girls. Self-esteem for these girls is at an all time low. Here in the U.S., many girls across the country have spoken to Ms. Mendelson about how they feel unfairly sexualized by the media. As a result, she has decided to include a section for kids/youth dedicated to discussion of what it means to have a positive feminine self image, e.g., what girls themselves have to say about the beauty and power of being feminine, and what boys have to say re: what they respect about girls, women, mothers and grandmothers.

Well wishes Part 2 will feature honest commentary about:

  • girls’ empowerment
  • the environment
  • how to stay out of gangs
  • inventions that would create a better world
  • what it means to love, to be a friend
  • the arts (dance, music, etc)
  • whatever else the kids want to say as necessary members of society
Like in Well Wishes Part 1, Well Wishes Part 2 will provide a captivating array of spontaneous interviews, original songs, raps, and instrumentals—all provided by the kids/youth themselves.

The Ground Rules for participation are as follows: All kids/youth are welcomed and none are pressured to participate.

These CDs will be donated to communities/regions in need of positive communications (for example, in areas experiencing the trauma of war and/or poverty and/or rape). Interested listeners are invited to sponsor the distribution of the CD in their communities and encouraged to help sponsor connections to communities beyond their geographic location. Along with the CD, cards and handwritten letters with personal words of support, hand drawn pictures, poems, and songs (Addendum 1b. Well Wishes and Blessings – Project Summary) are sent to these communities to enhance the message of the Well Wishes and Blessings CD. At present, these supporting materials are provided by children and adults across the United States.

Who conducts the activity?

Step One: CD Production. Eagle Vision intends to conduct these activities through one central manager supported by a number of regional field mangers and youth leaders around the U.S. who will organize and be a part of the interviewing process. All interviews will be digitally archived by a team of editors. The final CD will be created by the Chief Editor, who will select all final tracks for compilation and arranging. A team of engineers will provide “audio clean-up,” thus assuring the highest quality frequency response for all recording sources. Once created, the final dialogue will be transposed into written text and translated into a number of languages by native speakers. A small team of interviewers will record all translations and the Chief Editor will edit them in with original English dialogue (as well as re-arrange music where needed). All final CDs will be mastered with particular higher frequency equalization considerations for the hearing impaired (this is a key factor, as many in war zones are hard of hearing due to explosions). Youth around the U.S. will participate in the creation of the CD cover art.

Step 2: CD Distribution. Youth and adults across the U.S. will provide home-made friendship cards to be included in every case of CDs sent.

Producer Ruth Mendelson will be the Good Will Ambassador for the CD, answering communications from abroad in request for or response to the CD.



[2] Touch, move and inspire youth and adults

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Supporting the Development of EAGLE TV.

While interviewing teens throughout the U.S. for the Well Wishes Part 1 CD, Producer Ruth Mendelson learned first-hand how many youth feel underrepresented or utterly misrepresented by the media (i.e., many boys of color have experienced great pressure in daily life due to the racial stereotypes often presented in the media, while many girls feel unfairly sexualized by the same). Across the U.S., teens have expressed a strong need to see images of youth resembling themselves as people who actively care about the world around them, as well as those who face issues similar to the ones they themselves face.

The goal of EAGLE TV is to be a solution for all the teens who feel underrepresented and overlooked by the media.

EAGLE TV will be a platform for youth to upload and share video projects that speak to their identity and reflect issues they feel are relevant to them. Content would be focused on reality of life “telling your story” and not creating narrative fiction shorts. No venting and no violence. Criteria guidelines will require a higher standard of content than what most media currently presents: stories are to be honest, positive, and respectful in scope.

EAGLE TV will begin as a YouTube channel and then explore other, appropriate distribution channels as the project progresses. Additional methods of distribution will utilize a full array of social media tools and platforms.

EAGLE TV intends to serve as vehicle in connecting different youth groups across America and eventually across the world, thus becoming an umbrella organization of various non-profits who are engaging in similar things. In addition, EAGLE TV intends to become a relevant go-to resource for how youth are feeling. This initiative provides ways for youth to learn about what’s going on with other youth around the world.



[3] Uplift citizens of all ages

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Supporting the Development of CENTERS FOR THE ARTS.

Eagle Vision, as part of its overarching mission, intends to offer its support for the revitalization and regeneration of the creative arts and cultural heritage of the communities it serves. Eagle Vision will especially implement its support in areas that have traditionally been deprived of this form of support. Our ultimate goal is to engender the artistic and cultural life of communities, through which a new spirit of creativity will be engendered within the larger society. It is toward this end that the Organization has designed specific programs to be presented in a variety of dedicated spaces to utilize the rich variety of artistic media (music, dance, drama, visual media etc.). These Centers will provide the means for developing creativity, artistic expression, and learning within the community. While all participating members of the community will benefit as a result of these Centers, the primary focus will initially be on children and youth. The development of CENTERS FOR THE ARTS will be undertaken in partnership with community leaders, youth groups, artist cooperatives, cultural organizations, learning institutions, local government, and other interested bodies operational at the community level. Individual participants will develop creative skills through instruction, mentoring, apprenticeships, and workshops provided by local and regional artists. The Centers will be based in safe and accessible locations, maintain high ethical standards, and become an integral part of community life.

Following the identification of a receptive, committed, and participative community, Eagle Vision will introduce and support the process for developing CENTERS FOR THE ARTS. Thereafter the various stages of its development will be identified, roles and responsibilities outlined, operational expectations realized, and resource requirements identified. The physical space for each Center will vary, depending upon the resources available in the community. Eagle Vision will not provide financial assistance for these Centers, but will assist each community in developing and presenting programs that address the needs of that community. Alternative to the standard mode of operation, Eagle Vision is committed to cooperating with local organizations and schools to meet similar goals.

CENTERS FOR THE ARTS will provide programs that involve mentorship as a means to fortify development of artistic talent as well production skills in a variety of genres. One such artistic avenue will be that of community theatre. Theatre is a highly collaborative endeavor. Although the most recognizable figures in theatre are the directors, playwrights, and actors, plays are usually produced by a production team that commonly includes a scenic or set designer, lighting designer, costume designer, sound designer, stage manager, props mistress or master and production manager. The artistic staff is normally assisted by technical theatre personnel who handle creation and execution of the production.

As part of the grassroots, community-based theater movement that has been firmly established in the last 50 years (as detailed in "Grassroots, Community-based Theater: A View of the Field and Its Context," by Robert H. Leonard), Eagle Vision will utilize various theatrical forms to help underserved communities express the values, interests, concerns, and hopes of the community in which it is working.

The artistic intentions of Eagle Vision and the community-based work it produces will be immediately local, and most often entirely unique. Each community will be the originating inspiration and source of the plays. In many ways, the communities will shape the style of theater as well as the stories they tell and social contexts they bring to the stage. Eagle Vision will work closely with the local community in all aspects of production, connecting accomplished writers, directors, producers, actors, and technicians to assist as mentors in all aspects of production, from developing and writing the script; acting, set, and costume design; lighting and sound crew; rehearsing and advertising the show; setting up and running the show; to whatever follow-up is planned or required (i.e., educational outreach activities). Thus, every aspect of production will be a mentorship opportunity for professional and non-professional members of the community.

Local individuals will be given preference in all areas of production whenever possible as a way to engage, build, and uplift the community.

This blueprint for community building through art easily translates into successful music production as well. According to the community’s needs, the CENTERS FOR THE ARTS can feature music productions (performances) created entirely by members of the community themselves. Eagle Vision will work closely with community members, connecting accomplished artists, producers, and technicians who will serve as mentors to assist participants in songwriting, musicianship, performance, sound production, lighting, and media promotion.



[4] Effect healing by using the power of the arts in a variety of therapeutic modalities and settings

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Supporting the Development of THE ARTS AS HEALING MODALITIES.

Eagle Vision proposes to create a variety of programs and projects that use the arts as a modality of healing environments for those suffering from physical and emotion conditions. Initiatives include research studies as well as live performances in hospitals and various treatment centers as well as providing artwork (paintings, audio CDs, DVDs and the various forms of artistic media) as well.

Current programs under consideration include research designed by Kathleen Howland Ph.D., renowned music therapist specializing in neurology, and professor at Berklee College of Music and Boston Conservatory. These studies are designed to utilized music in assisting the elderly recovering from stroke, assist patients recovering from comatose states, as well as the value of music education as an avocation across the lifespan.

Pediatricians, clinicians, and hospitals (including Mattel’s Children Hospital at UCLA) have also expressed interest in working with Eagle Vision to create programs and projects that utilize the arts as a healing modality. The following research proposals were designed for Eagle Vision by Dr. Howland.

Research #1: Melodic Intonation Therapy in acute stroke care

Melodic Intonation Therapy (MIT) is a protocol that is used to help patients with strokes recover their ability to talk. When doing a stroke assessment, a speech pathologist will assess one’s ability to speak (to repeat words, to name objects, to describe a picture) and to sing (e.g., “Happy birthday”). Candidates for this treatment protocol will be described as Broca’s aphasics following the stroke assessment. Generally they have good auditory comprehension, the ability to self-correct, good attention spans, and limited verbal output.

The treatment protocol is based on teaching short, functional phrases (e.g., I’m hungry, I have pain) in a more musical way. The natural rhythm and melody of speech is enhanced. The phrases are then repeated until the patient can utter them independently. The enhancement of the musical quality of speech engages a different brain circuitry than the patient’s effort to speak (which is typically the site of the stroke). Typically speech is a left hemispheric activity and melodic productions are right hemispheric. It is hypothesized that effect of MIT is a recruitment of language regions in the right hemisphere that can facilitate recovery of expressive speech.

The Therapeutics and Technology Assessment Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology labeled MIT as “promising.” There have not been many studies published that can truly support the effectiveness of MIT (Carroll, 1996). The most prominent research center is located at the Music and Neuroimaging Lab at Beth Israel Hospital. The subjects of these experiments to date have been at 12 months past their stroke. This window of time after the stroke is important in research to demonstrate that the changes seen in treatment are not due to natural healing. Although the research to date is quite promising, it has not been applied to acute care.

Acute care involves medical stabilization followed by rehabilitation. Due to changes in insurance (private and federal), the time spent in acute care has been dramatically cut in the past ten years from two to three months to a matter of weeks. A recent example is a patient who received only one week of speech therapy services in a rehabilitation center. Although he is an intelligent man, he cannot express himself three years after his stroke. He cannot name his children (he calls them all by the eldest’s name), state what he wants to eat or how he is feeling. If the stroke had impaired his walking, he would have received longer rehabilitation services, including more speech therapy.

This proposal seeks to imbed a music therapist in an acute rehabilitation setting to provide stroke patients with Melodic Intonation Therapy. This funding would also allow for research to be conducted within this setting to identify benefits and disseminate the findings.

This project would bridge the gap that now exists between research and patient access to this protocol in acute stages. The findings of this research could facilitate use of Melodic Intonation Therapy nationally as a best practice in stroke care.

Who conducts the activity?

A music therapist in an acute rehabilitation setting to provide stroke patients with Melodic Intonation Therapy.

When is the activity conducted?

When patients are in acute rehabilitation settings due to stroke.

Where is the activity conducted?

Acute rehabilitation settings.

How does the activity further your exempt purposes?

The establishment of Arts and Healing research is dedicated to serving society without a profit-making motive. Any net proceeds that may arise from an initiative within the Organization will be used to further support the initiative.

What percentage of your total time is allocated to the activity?

Having four major initiatives at this moment, we estimate 25% of our resources to be allocated toward this activity.

How is the activity funded?

Eagle Vision’s initiatives will be funded by grants and donations made possible by contributing individuals; foundations and corporations; Federal, State and Municipal government allocations; and other endowments for the arts that may be identified.

Research #2: Sensory stimulation of comatose patients

Sensory stimulation is intended to promote awakening and enhance the rehabilitative potential of brain-injured patients in a coma or vegetative state. Stimulation programs target any or all of the following senses: visual, auditory, olfactory, gustatory, cutaneous, and kinesthetic. Various stimuli may be used for each sense. In auditory stimulation for example, patient preferred music may be used as well as therapist preferred. The radio may also be considered part of the regime.

Sensory stimulation is provided by a number of professionals including nurses, occupational therapists, physical therapists and speech-language therapists. In some cases, family members may be trained in the techniques and are given primary responsibility for providing the therapy. Treatment may be delivered in the hospital, the patient's home, or a nursing home. There is no set protocol and delivery may vary dramatically from therapist to therapist.

Research in neurosciences demonstrates an extraordinary robustness for music. For example, infants are born into the world being able to distinguish music that they heard previously in the womb to music that is novel. In the face of illness, these innate capacities continue to remain robust. For example, patients with advanced Alzheimer’s disease are able to sing songs of their youth long after their functional use of language. Patients with strokes make greater advancements in their recovery to walk if they have had rhythmic music facilitate their gait training. It is thus hypothesized that music would have the greatest opportunity to reach across the divide of pathology and facilitate recovery in patients with brain injuries and accompanying coma.

Most insurance companies deem sensory stimulation programs “not medically necessary.” To date, research has not proved the efficacy of these programs and therefore support is very limited. Part of the challenge in demonstrating efficacy is the lack of uniformity in patient delivery. This proposal seeks to establish protocols for auditory stimulation with comatose patients. In order to accomplish this, a music therapist and researcher would work in collaboration to review the literature and plan a treatment approach. This approached would be modified in the first three months of a pilot study in a rehabilitation hospital with a coma unit (to include veterans returning from overseas with brain injuries). The remaining funding period would be dedicated to providing services and collecting data for analysis on the efficacy of the intervention.

It is hoped that this project would establish national standards for treatment of patients with brain injuries. It would validate the importance of music in the lives of the most medically fragile and add to the literature and understanding of the neurological foundations of music.

Who conducts the activity?

Sensory stimulation is provided by a number of professionals including nurses, occupational therapists, physical therapists, and speech-language therapists. In some cases, family members may be trained in the techniques and are given primary responsibility for providing the therapy.

When is the activity conducted?

When patients are in a coma or vegetative state.

Where is the activity conducted?

Treatment may be delivered in the hospital, the patient's home, or a nursing home. There is no set protocol and delivery may vary dramatically from therapist to therapist.

How does the activity further your exempt purposes?

The establishment of Arts and Healing research is dedicated to serving society without a profit-making motive. Any net proceeds that may arise from an initiative within the Organization will be used to further support the initiative.

What percentage of your total time is allocated to the activity?

Having four major initiatives at this moment, we estimate 25% of our resources to be allocated toward this activity.

How is the activity funded?

Eagle Vision’s initiatives will be funded by grants and donations made possible by contributing individuals; foundations and corporations; Federal, State and Municipal government allocations; and other endowments for the arts that may be identified.

Research #3: The value of musical training as an avocation across the lifespan

Nationally school music programs are being threatened with budget cuts or elimination. The scope of the Music Educators National Conference advocacy has been focused on a variety of arguments to support school music programs: supporting learning in other subjects, developing the “whole child,” building society and citizenship, supporting the school environment for learning, etc. Long-term student success is reflected in studies that review music training and lower crime rates or music training and medical school enrollment, for example.

We are of the opinion that music should be taught so that children are able to create and participate in music across their lifespan. The opportunity to make and share music with others would provide children and adults with a consistent and reliable source of joy and comfort. Plus the discipline of music development is a lifelong pursuit that is cognitively engaging and socially enriching. This is key to aging well.

The Harvard Study of Adult Development has been investigating the aging process with hundreds of participants since 1930. Their findings for aging well include familiar refrains of “avoiding cigarettes, keeping a healthy weight, exercising regularly.” In addition, they have found that successful aging is also based on maintaining strong social relationships, pursuing education and having good adjustment or coping skills. George Vaillant, M.D.of the Harvard study said, “curiosity and creativity help transform older people into seemingly younger ones.” The MacArthur Foundation study supports the findings of the Harvard study. They define successful aging as “the ability to maintain three key behaviors or characteristics: low risk of disease and disease-related disability, high mental and physical function and active engagement with life.”

Music education is uniquely poised to provide the basis for skill development in school-aged children that will support aging well as identified in the above studies. This proposal would be a first step to identifying the benefits of music as an avocation in the lives of a broad base of interviewees. A pilot study of three interviews were conducted to establish questions of interest and protocols for data collection. Initial responses have been promising. For example, Bill Whitcraft was 88 at the time of his interview. He received an Master’s degree in Science from Harvard University in 1939. He spent his career developing radar technology in World War II and beyond. He was also a skilled pianist who was greatly respected in the jazz community of greater Boston. During his interview he had this to say: “music has been a sustaining force for me all my life. It has been the driving force behind me in many ways. I think it stabilizes my outlook on life, particularly in my old age (now that I can see the “dark” end of the tunnel!!).”

This research proposal would entail the interviews, transcriptions, and analysis of 50 participants who are retired and actively engaged in music making. The participants will represent varied musical genres (classical, jazz, folk) and professional backgrounds (not college educated, bachelors/masters/doctoral educated). The results of the analysis will be reviewed in the context of the longitudinal studies noted above to tie in the findings of the two fields of research.

The results of this study would be published in a respected, peer reviewed music education journal. Presentations to the music education and gerontology community at both the local and national levels would be submitted to the respective professional organizations.

It is hoped that the success of this project would broaden the arguments in support of music education in school systems.